Vacuum Pump Noise

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ToxLabRat
ToxLabRat's picture
Vacuum Pump Noise

Today I hooked up an Elan 6000 ICP-MS that had been down for two weeks.  Before it was shut down and unhooked, it had no issues and the pumps (Turbo, Roughing and Vacuum) were all operating correctly.  Today after getting the instrument connected to the chiller, exhaust and computer, I flipped on all four breakers and the hook up was sucessful.  However when I turned on the vacuum pump so that it could begin pumping down the vacuum chamber, it was extremley rough and noisy sounding.  The oil level was fine and the oil was fresh and clean.  The noise did not seem to be comming from the pump itself, but up near the top of the instrument where the interface exhaust is hooked up.  I realize there is a hose that runs from the front of the vacuum pump to the interface exhaust chamber, and thought maybe the issue was insuffcient pull from the exhaust fan or a leak in the exhaust hose, but when I checked it all seemed to be working properly.  Since I had another vacuum pump that had been refurbished, I decided to change them out and see if that made a difference in the noise and ragged sounds of the pump as it pumped down.  So after changing them out and turning the pump on, the noise was still present.  Even though the instrument was unhooked and then hooked back up again, the pump area and inside hardware, electronics, ect. where not touched.  Only the IEE cable, the chiller inlet and outlet hoses (which have been checked and are on properly) and of course the power cords.  If anyone out there has experiencced an issue like this and can offer any advice, then I would appreciate it.
thanks

Arvind Singh Pundir
Arvind Singh Pundir's picture
ToxLabRat wrote:

ToxLabRat wrote:

Today I hooked up an Elan 6000 ICP-MS that had been down for two weeks.  Before it was shut down and unhooked, it had no issues and the pumps (Turbo, Roughing and Vacuum) were all operating correctly.  Today after getting the instrument connected to the chiller, exhaust and computer, I flipped on all four breakers and the hook up was sucessful.  However when I turned on the vacuum pump so that it could begin pumping down the vacuum chamber, it was extremley rough and noisy sounding.  The oil level was fine and the oil was fresh and clean.  The noise did not seem to be comming from the pump itself, but up near the top of the instrument where the interface exhaust is hooked up.  I realize there is a hose that runs from the front of the vacuum pump to the interface exhaust chamber, and thought maybe the issue was insuffcient pull from the exhaust fan or a leak in the exhaust hose, but when I checked it all seemed to be working properly.  Since I had another vacuum pump that had been refurbished, I decided to change them out and see if that made a difference in the noise and ragged sounds of the pump as it pumped down.  So after changing them out and turning the pump on, the noise was still present.  Even though the instrument was unhooked and then hooked back up again, the pump area and inside hardware, electronics, ect. where not touched.  Only the IEE cable, the chiller inlet and outlet hoses (which have been checked and are on properly) and of course the power cords.  If anyone out there has experiencced an issue like this and can offer any advice, then I would appreciate it.
thanks

Hi Sir,
as you have tried your best to sort out the problem that still persists, i think now the best way is to call the doctor, i mean the technical personnel from the company  you bought it as they are best trained for that may be you are having an AMC with them hope it works
 

ToxLabRat
ToxLabRat's picture
thanks, but we are down two

thanks, but we are down two service engineers in my area and no one could get out to my lab for another week.  I re-examined the situation today and it seemed that there was definately air getting into the vacuum system from somewhere.  Since neither of the two hoses (pump to turbo controller and pump to exhaust chamber) had any leaks and all o-rings, gaskets and clamps were secure, I deduced that the air leak must be comming from the vacuum chamber itself.  So I removed the chamber lid and saw nothing inside that was out of place.  Then as I was putting the lid back on, I decided to turn it over and check on the two large o-rings that fit in the two section grooves, and it turns out, one had become very loose and was not fitting into the groove properly, causing air to leak into the chamber and thus into the system itself.  Once I replaced the o-ring with a spare from my other 6000 it took care of the problem and I was able to achieve a good vacuum and the noise factor was eliminated.  Just thought I would put this out there so that in the future if someone has a similar problem they can use it for reference and maybe save some time troubleshooting.  I have never experienced one of those o-rings wearing out or comming loose in the past, but there is a first time for everything.

Dr. Analytical
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Thanks for sharing your

Thanks for sharing your solution to your problem.  This is the kind of interaction we want to cultivate here at scientistsolutions.com.  We appreciate your efforts to write up a complete summary.
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