Bone sensation

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Dominiquest
Dominiquest's picture
Bone sensation

I have observed a lot that when a bone is wounded or even when ice is left on a bony section of the body, the bone begins to pain.... This should mean that there are nerve endings in the bone tissue... I have not been able to understand exactly how the nerve fibres are placed within the bone tissue which provides sensation... Are they present in the form of a net or do they have a particular path that they follow?

Fraser Moss
Fraser Moss's picture
Bones do not have their own

Bones do not have their own integrated neurons to sense pain. Broken/bruised bones hurt for a because:

1) Bones are surrounded by nerve endings some of which are from pain fibers. These fibers fire when when the bone is broken or bruised.

2) Broken bones bleed, and the blood and associated swelling (edema) causes pain.

3) When a bone brakes, the muscles that surround the injured area may go into spasm as they attempt to hold the broken bone fragments in place. These spasms cause further pain.

4) In your example of prolonged exposure to ice, it is the pain fibers in the surrounding tissue that are signaling the sensation of pain

Dominiquest
Dominiquest's picture
Thank you for this

Thank you for this information... Its nice to know a replacement of any injured part of bone won't leave behind the "phantom limb" sensation.