Bioethics, western medical dogma, and Sir John Maddox

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Omai
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Bioethics, western medical dogma, and Sir John Maddox

John Maddox served as editor of Nature on and off from 1966 to 1995. This editorial represents a very strange case brought before the journal in 1988 from well known immunologist Jacques Benveniste. I will use a paragraph from the editorial by Paul Wolpe to describe its impact on bioethics.
"What are we to learn from this strange case? Perhaps the most important lesson is that science, like any other belief system, can overrespond to a perceived threat in ways that undermine its very claim to dispassionate, empirical means of determining truth. Even when established scientific methods are followed scrupulously, as Benveniste did in his initial article, biomedical gatekeepers can respond defensively if the findings tweak their prejudices. It is not so much unusual or unexpected findings that are problematic, or even findings that overturn established facts or assumptions; after all, that is what the scientific method is presumably for. What is much harder to countenance is what we might think of as heresy, the challenge not of facts but of the often taken-for-granted assumptions that form the ideological structures into which facts are supposed to fit."
Trust me, this is a fascinating story. Dogma and the fight against conventional thought is paramount to advances in science. Without this fight, we would still believe the Earth is flat. But on the other hand, a journal has to fit into some scientific standard.
Check it out and let me know what you think.
Omai