Exploring Modular Protein Architecture

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Exploring Modular Protein Architecture

Date & Location: 19 - 22 January 2010, Advanced Training Centre, EMBL Heidelberg, Germany

Event website & Registration: www.embl.de/courses/proteinarchitecture/2010

Registration deadline: 4 December 2009

Aims

Over the last few years a new paradigm has been emerging concerning the nature of Eukaryotic regulatory proteins - contrasting with the nice neat globular protein view expounded by biochemical and cell biological textbooks. Instead, many proteins have a remarkable number of architecture modules - including long natively disordered segments and short linear motifs that are awkward to investigate computationally and experimentally.

The course will set the scene by introducing the biological concepts behind these architecture modules and provide extensive hands-on application of the relevant bioinformatics tools with appropriate example proteins. The power - but also the limitations, which remain substantial - of the currently available software will be examined.

Topics

- Introduction to Common Bioinformatic Tools (optional initial half day at no extra cost)
- Multiple Sequence Alignment
- Protein-Protein Interaction Networks
- Predicting Globular Domains and Native Disorder
- Exploring Regulatory Protein Motifs
- 3D Structures of Proteins and Protein-Protein Interactions
- Bioinformatic Resource Integration

Instructors

Nigel Brown, University of Heidelberg, Germany
Ricardo Rodriguez De La Vega, EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
Francesca Diella, Biobyte Solutions GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany
Niall Haslam, Complex and Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Germany
Lars Juhl Jensen, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research, Denmark
Philip McDermott , University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Sean O'Donoghue, EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
Steve Pettifer, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Venkata Satagopam, EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
Andrea Schafferhans-Fuhrmann, TU Muenchen, Germany
David Thorne, University of Manchester, United Kingdom