IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY, IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION & LIVE CELL IMAGING

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Fraser Moss
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IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY, IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION & LIVE CELL IMAGING

IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY, IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION & LIVE CELL IMAGING
October 21 - November 3, 2005
Application Deadline: July 15, 2005

http://meetings.cshl.edu/courses/c-situ05.shtml

Instructors:
Abby Dernburg, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
John Murray, University of Pennsylvania
Jason Swedlow, University of Dundee, UK

Assistant Instructors:
Tamara Howard, University of New Mexico
Ke Hu, Scripps Research Institute
William Moore, University of Dundee, UK
Jamy Peng, University of California, Berkeley
Melpomeni Platani, EMBL, Germany

This course focuses on specialized techniques in microscopy, in-situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and live cell imaging related to localizing DNA, RNA, and proteins in fixed cells as well as protein and RNA dynamics in living cells. The course emphasizes the use of the latest equipment and techniques in fluorescence microscopy, including confocal laser scanning microscopy, deconvolution methods, digital image processing, and time-lapse imaging of living specimens. The course is designed to present students with state-of-the-art technology and scientific expertise in the use of light microscopy to address basic questions in cellular and molecular biology. The course is designed for the molecular biologist who is in need of microscopic approaches and for the cell biologist who is not familiar with the practical application of the advanced techniques presented in the course. Among the methods presented are the preparation of tagged nucleic acid probes, fixation methods, detection of multiple DNA sequences in single nuclei or chromosome spreads, comparative genomic hybridization, cellular localization of RNA, localization of nucleic acids and proteins in the same cells, use of a variety of reporter molecules and non-antibody fluorescent tags, indirect antibody labeling, detection of multiple proteins in a single cell, and the use of GFP variants to study protein expression, localization and dynamics. In each method, several experimental protocols are presented allowing the students to assess the relative merits of each and to relate them to their own research. Students are encouraged to bring their own nucleic acid, protein, or antibody probes to the course, which are used in addition to those provided by the instructors. The laboratory exercises are supplemented with lectures given by invited distinguished scientists, who present up-to-the-minute reports on current methods and research using the techniques being presented.

Speakers in last year's course included:
Richard Day, University of Virginia
Michael Difilippantonio, National Cancer Institute/NIH
David Spector, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Andrea Stout, University of Pennsylvania
Phong Tran, University of Pennsylvania
Clare Waterman-Storer, Scripps Research Institute

This course is supported with funds provided by the National Cancer Institute

Cost (including board and lodging): $2,665