One gene/one protein, the death of an idea, the birth of a new field.

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Omai
Omai's picture
One gene/one protein, the death of an idea, the birth of a new field.

It is an antiquated notion that each of our genes encodes for a single protein. There just are not enough genes to do the job of biology. Recent advances have found that a single gene can encode multiple different protein products and of course RNA products that perform countless functions other than protein coding. Even our thoughts on the gene being the single unit of heredity is being challenged. Epigenetic research reveals that DNA binding proteins are also "inherited" during cell division.
Clearly we have just scratched the surface, in terms of genetic and genomic research.

Here is an interesting lay article describing these topics.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/11/science/11gene.html?pagewanted=1&em

Omai

Jen_Floyd
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I saw that one a few weeks

I saw that one a few weeks ago. It's cool because since the genome was sequenced with less than a third of the predicted gene number than was predicted before it was sequenced there has been crazy speculation as to the increase in complexity from mouse to human. I can't wait to find out what the answer might be.