The Era of Consumer Genetics

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Omai
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The Era of Consumer Genetics

Check out this very interesting article in the New York Times from one of the people who volunteered to have there entire genome and medical history posted on the web.

Here is his picture from the New York Times. (I just wanted to practice using the new text editor!) His name is Steven Pinker and he is a cognitive pschologist. He makes some very interesting connections between genes/genomes and psychology/behavior.
Well worth the read.
Here is the link:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/11/magazine/11Genome-t.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&em
Omai

Omai
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Here is an interesting quote

Here is an interesting quote from the article I meant to post.
"Looking to the genome for the nature of the person is far from innocuous. In the 20th century, many intellectuals embraced the idea that babies are blank slates that are inscribed by parents and society. It allowed them to distance themselves from toxic doctrines like that of a superior race, the eugenic breeding of a better species or a genetic version of the Twinkie Defense in which individuals or society could evade responsibility by saying that it’s all in the genes. When it came to human behavior, the attitude toward genetics was “Don’t go there.” Those who did go there found themselves picketed, tarred as Nazis and genetic determinists or, in the case of the biologist E. O. Wilson, doused with a pitcher of ice water at a scientific conference.
Today, as the lessons of history have become clearer, the taboo is fading. Though the 20th century saw horrific genocides inspired by Nazi pseudoscience about genetics and race, it also saw horrific genocides inspired by Marxist pseudoscience about the malleability of human nature. The real threat to humanity comes from totalizing ideologies and the denial of human rights, rather than a curiosity about nature and nurture. Today it is the humane democracies of Scandinavia that are hotbeds of research in behavioral genetics, and two of the groups who were historically most victimized by racial pseudoscience — Jews and African-Americans — are among the most avid consumers of information about their genes."
It really is a good read.
 
Omai