GPR50

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queloi
queloi's picture
GPR50

I'm starting to work on GPR50 (Orphan-A GPCR).
does anyone have an idea of the half-life of the protein?
and does anyone have tried siRNA in GPR50 in the brain?
in fact any info about the mouse GPR50 in the brain will be the great for me.
thanks

Sandy
Sandy's picture
queloi wrote:I'm starting to

queloi wrote:

I'm starting to work on GPR50 (Orphan-A GPCR).
does anyone have an idea of the half-life of the protein?
and does anyone have tried siRNA in GPR50 in the brain?
in fact any info about the mouse GPR50 in the brain will be the great for me.
thanks

I have found this article it might help:

Sex-specific association between bipolar affective disorder in women and GPR50, an X-linked orphan G protein-coupled receptor.
Mol Psychiatry. 2004 Sep 28;
GPR50: is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) located on Xq28, a region previously implicated in multiple genetic studies of bipolar affective disorder (BPAD). Allele frequencies of three polymorphisms in GPR50 were compared in case-control studies between subjects with BPAD (264), major depressive disorder (MDD) (226), or schizophrenia (SCZ) (263) and ethnically matched controls (562). Significant associations were found between an insertion/deletion polymorphism in exon 2 and both BPAD (P=0.0070), and MDD (P=0.011) with increased risk associated with the deletion variant (GPR50(Delta502-505)). When the analysis was restricted to female subjects, the associations with BPAD and MDD increased in significance (P=0.00023 and P=0.0064, respectively). Two other single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tested within this gene showed associations between: the female MDD group and an SNP in exon 2 (P=0.0096); and female SCZ and an intronic SNP (P=0.0014). No association was detected in males with either MDD, BPAD or SCZ. These results suggest that GPR50(Delta502-505), or a variant in tight linkage disequilibrium with this polymorphism, is a sex-specific risk factor for susceptibility to bipolar disorder, and that other variants in the gene may be sex-specific risk factors in the development of schizophrenia.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 28 September 2004; doi:10.1038/sj.mp.4001593
[Abstract]

There is also a link you might like to click-on:
http://www.origene.com/antibody/TA200424.aspx