Neutrophils, Basophilic and Eosinophilic (acidophilic)

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sharonlmy
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Neutrophils, Basophilic and Eosinophilic (acidophilic)

What relevance are the terms basophilic and eosinophilic to the naming of the three types of granulocytes?
 

Arvind Singh Pundir
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Hi Sharonlmy

Hi Sharonlmy

The  three types of granulocytes as we know are characterised by the presence of granules in their cytoplasm.and are distinguished by their appearance under Wright's stain .

(Wright's stain is a histologic stain that facilitates the differentiation of blood cell types. It is used primarily to stain peripheral blood smears and bone marrow needle aspiration biopsy which are examined under a light microscope)

Their names are derived from their staining characteristics; for example, the most abundant granulocyte is the neutrophil granulocyte, which has neutrally-staining cytoplasmic granules.
During the myelocyte stage, granulocytes form specific granules that have characteristic staining affinity, eg, basophilic for basophils, eosinophilic for eosinophils, and neutral for neutrophils.

 The suffix (or prefix) "phil" comes from the Greek word meaning love. It is used to specify an attraction or affinity towards something. It is seen in such words as philosophy, philanthropy and bibliophile. This suffix is used in naming the three granulocytes: eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils. Eosinophils "love" or are attracted to the eosin histology dye; thus the granules in an eosinophil are orange/pink. Basophils "love" or are attracted to the basophilic histology dye; thus the granules in a basophil are blue. Neutrophils "love" or are attracted to the neutral histology dye; thus the granules in a neutrophil are neutral colored.www.histology-world.com/factsheets/blood1.htm

sharonlmy
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thanks for your assistance!

thanks for your assistance!